Fall 2013 Seminars

  • Seminar with Professor Sarah Trimpin  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Thursday, 8/29/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor Sarah Trimpin, Wayne State University
    Field: Analytical
    Host: Luke Hanley
  • Seminar with Professor Nathan Gianneschi, University of California, San Diego  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Tuesday, 9/3/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor, Nathan Gianneschi, University of California, San Diego

    Field: Physical

    Host: Petr Kral

    Seminar Title:  Enzyme-Directed Targeting of Nanoparticles to Tumors

    Abstract:

    The goal of targeted therapeutics and molecular diagnostics is to accumulate drugs or probes at the site of disease in higher quantities relative to other locations in the body. To achieve this, there is tremendous interest in the development of nanomaterials capable of acting as carriers or reservoirs of therapeutics and diagnostics in vivo. Generally, nanoscale particles are favored for this task as they can be large enough to function as carriers of multiple copies of a given small molecule, can display multiple targeting functionalities, and can be small enough to be safely injected into the blood stream. The general goal is that particles will either target passively via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, actively by incorporation of targeting groups, or by a combination of both. Nanoparticle targeting strategies have largely relied on the use of surface conjugated ligands designed to bind overexpressed cell-membrane receptors associated with a given cell-type. We envisioned a targeting strategy that would lead to an active accumulation of nanoparticles by virtue of a supramolecular assembly event specific to tumor tissue, occurring in response to a specific signal. The most desirable approach to stimuli-induced targeting would be to utilize an endogenous signal, specific to the diseased tissue itself, capable of actively targeting materials introduced via intravenous (IV) injection. We present the development of nanoparticles capable of assembling in vivo in response to selective, endogenous, biomolecular signals. For this purpose, we utilize enzymes as stimuli, rather than other recognition events, because they are uniquely capable of propagating a signal via catalytic amplification. We will describe the development and implementation of these stimuli-responsive materials.

  • Seminar with Professor Melissa Reynolds  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Thursday, 9/5/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor Melissa Reynolds, Colorado State University
    Field: Analytical
    Host: Luke Hanley
  • Seminar with Prof. Shawn Collins, University of Montreal  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Tuesday, 9/10/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
  • Seminar with Professor Bongsup Cho, University of Rhode Island, College of Pharmacy  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Tuesday, 9/17/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
  • Seminar with Prof. Mingjie Zhang, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Tuesday, 9/24/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Prof. Mingjie Zhang
    Seminar  Title:  Structural Biology of Scaffold Proteins in Neuronal Development and Signaling
    Field: Biochemistry
    Host:  Wonhwa Cho
  • Seminar with Professor Niko Hildebrandt, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay, Frrance  Add To Calendar

    2214 SES
    Tuesday, 10/1/13 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • Seminar with Professor Bennett Van Houten, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology  Add To Calendar

    TBA
    Tuesday, 10/1/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor Bennett Van Houten, University of Pittsburgh
    Departments of Pharmacology & Chemical Biology
    Field: Biochemistry
    Host: Jung-Hyun Min
  • Seminar with Professor Steven Tait, Indiana University  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Thursday, 10/3/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
  • Seminar with Prof. Kyung Bo Kim, University of Kentucky  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Tuesday, 10/8/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor, Kyung Bo Kim 
    Field:  Organic
    Host: Daesung Lee
    Seminar Title: 

    Chemical Approaches to Improving Proteasome-Targeted Cancer Therapies


     

  • Seminar with Prof. Rachel Martin, UC Irvine  Add To Calendar

    138 SES
    Monday, 10/21/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor Rachel Martin
    Title:   "Biophysical & structural investigation of aggregation in a cataract-related variant of the human eye lens protein yS-crystallin"
    Field: Biochemistry
    Host:  Yoshitaka Ishii
     
  • Seminar with Professor Daniel Weix, University of Rochester  Add To Calendar

    TBA
    Tuesday, 10/22/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor, Daniel Weix, University of Rochester
    Field: Organic
    Host: Laura Anderson
  • Seminar with Prof. Glenn Micalizio, University of Dartmouth  Add To Calendar

    138 SES
    Friday, 10/25/13 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
    Speaker: Prof. Glenn Micalizio
    Field: Organic
    Host: Tom Driver
    Title:  "Metallacycle-Mediated Crows-Coupling:  Reaction development and application in stereoselective synthesis"

    Abstract:  Professor Micalizio will discuss the conceptual framework behind his program in metallacycle-mediated cross-coupling chemistry.  In addition to providing a summary of the basic reaction designs that fueled their initial studies, a short discussion of coupling reactions that are effective for the regio- and stereoselective union of substituted and electronically unactivated π-systems will be presented.  Finally, the seminar will conclude with a focused discussion on application of their technology in natural product synthesis.

  • Seminar with Professor Seth Rubin, University of California, Santa Cruz  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Tuesday, 10/29/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor, Seth Rubin, University of California, Santa Cruz
    Field: Biochemistry
    Host: Jung-Hyun Min
    Title: "Specificity in Cell Cycle Signaling by Multisite Phosphorylation"
    Abstract:  

    Protein phosphorylation is central to cell cycle signal integration. Phosphorylation of regulatory proteins on multiple sites generates manifold responses and intricate signaling properties. A common model for the function of multisite Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) phosphorylation is that sites are redundant in function but together tune signaling sensitivity.   In contrast, my laboratory has been studying two cell cycle contexts in which phosphorylation on specific sites induces distinct structural and biochemical effects.  First, I will describe our recent efforts in characterizing the Cdk subunit Cks as a specificity factor for Cdk activity. We find that Cks binds specific phosphorylated sequences in Cdk substrates in order to facilitate processive phosphorylation and associate Cdk with its regulators.  Second, I will describe our structural characterization of Retinoblastoma protein  (Rb) inactivation.  Rb is an important tumor suppressor protein and negative regulator of S phase.  We find that discrete phosphorylation events induce diverse Rb structures that inhibit different Rb-protein interactions.  These observations suggest that multisite phosphorylation serves as a code for inducing distinct functional outputs.

  • Seminar with Hossein Sadeghpour, Harvard  Add To Calendar

    2214 SES
    Wednesday, 10/30/13 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor Hossein Sadeghpour
    Field: Physical
    Host:  Petr Kral
    Title:

    "Field focusing of homonuclear molecules in the ultracold regime: how to make pendular states with 100 mV/cm"

    Abstract:

    Coherent control of molecular orientation is a holy grail. In this talk, I will describe how one could control with precision the orientation of an ultracold polar molecule with a tiny external field. The field of cold and ultracold atomic and molecular physics has led to a large number of  impressive achievements over the last two decades, including the creation of  polar molecules in their absolute quantum ground state (translation, electronic, rovibronic and hyperfine). The beauty lies in precise control of interactions over atomic and molecular processes, from radiative to collisional transitions. I will focus on a novel way of making ultracold molecules with fascinating and exaggerated properties. These molecules have extent of roughly 100 nm! The molecular binding results from the interaction of an ultracold atom in highly-excited Rydberg states with an ultracold (or cold) atomic or molecular perturber.



  • Seminar with Prof. Marcus Jones, University of North Carolina at Charlotte  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Thursday, 10/31/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Professor Marcus Jones
    Title:  "Plasmonic enhancement of multi-exciton emission in colloidal quantum dots"
    Field:  Physical & Inorganic
    Host:  Preston Snee
  • Seminar with Prof. Mattieeu Sollogoub, Sorbonne University  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Tuesday, 11/5/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Prof. Matthieu Sollogoub
    Institution:  UPMC,Sorbonne University, IUF, Paris, France
    Title: Site-selective reactions on highly symmetric  molecules: cyclodextrins. Methodology and  applications
     Field: Organic
    Host: Vladimir Gevorgyan
  • Seminar with Prof. Wojciech Dzwolak, University of Warsaw, Poland  Add To Calendar

    238 SES
    Thursday, 11/7/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Prof. Wojciech Dzwolak
    Field: Physical
    Host: Timothy Keiderling
    Title:  The self-assembly of amyloid-like protein fibrils:
                A new (superstructural) order.
    Abstract: Formation of linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein molecules, so-called amyloid fibrils, has long been associated with numerous degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. Because amyloidogenesis is a generic property of polypeptides it may be induced in vitro in benign proteins and even synthetic peptides. In my talk, I will focus on the polymorphism of amyloid assemblies of two model polypeptides: insulin and polyglutamic acid which manifests in newly observed fascinating chiral superstructures of amyloid fibrils [1-2]. I will also show how self-propagating polymorphism of insulin fibrils in vitro parallels the in vivo phenomenon of prion strains which is related to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease [3]. My talk will highlight applications of conventional spectroscopic methods such as infrared absorption and circular dichroism for ‘fingerprinting’ of fine structural features of these assemblies which are often inaccessible to high-resolution structural methods.
  • Seminar with Dr. Michael Seidman, National Institutes of Health  Add To Calendar

    TBA
    Tuesday, 11/19/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: Dr. Michael Seidman, National Institute  of Health
    Field: Biochemistry
    Host: Jung-Hyun Min
  • Seminar with guest to be announced [IV]  Add To Calendar

    Tuesday, 11/26/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: To be announced
    Host: Luke Hanley
  • Seminar speaker with guest to be announced [VII]  Add To Calendar

    TBA
    Tuesday, 12/10/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: To be announced
    Host: Luke Hanley
  • Seminar speaker with guest to be announced [VIII]  Add To Calendar

    TBA
    Thursday, 12/12/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: To be announced
    Host: Luke Hanley
  • Seminar speaker with guest to be announced [IX]  Add To Calendar

    TBA
    Tuesday, 12/17/13 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
    Speaker: To be announced
    Host: Luke Hanley